Monday, December 15, 2008

Target Poker Players

As we spoke about below (Marketing what you are, not what you are not), I am a big believer in using marketing to target gamblers. One group I would like to see us aggressively go after are poker players. They like 'games' and if they were not paying poker they would be sports betting, or playing backgammon for cash like in the basements of New York City.

Craig at Trackmaster gives us a look at some of the similarities of the game in his last post: "Hold’em Your Horses: Using Poker Concepts at the Track"

10 comments:

Superfecta said...

This was my big push for the NTRA Marketing Summit; I still have an entire presentation on it. Can't imagine much has been done, of course...

darkforce1012 said...

Race 15 Meadows
# 6 Hes done it All
across the Board

Pull the Pocket said...

Do you have that on your site? I did not notice it in the report, although maybe I missed it.

Geno said...

Thanks for the Trackmaster link, he offers some really good advice we should all take heed.

I have been enjoying the back and forth on the marketing play.

Superfecta said...

I still have my version of it, but it was edited out of the final version presented at the conference. I should probably PDF it and put it up somewhere.

Allan said...

I think we should be marketing to the big gamblers as well as the casual fan. That being said, the scale for each demographic should be appropriate for the benefit it brings to the sport.

Anonymous said...

Correlate the major poker tatic of bluffing to horse racing.
RG

Pull the Pocket said...

Correlate the major poker tatic of bluffing to horse racing.

Betting $1000 at a B track on a horse to show that you actually want to bet, and then cancelling $980 of the bet at post time?

:)

Ok, I cant think of one. Maybe someone can.

TrackMaster Craig said...

I didn't think it fit with the article so I didn't put it in, but there is an example I thought of. When a successful claiming trainer drops a horse down in claiming price and adds front wraps to throw off others from claiming the horse, but in reality is just tying to steal a purse with an easy victory. I would call that a form of bluffing.

Allan said...

Unfortunately, having people cancel bets at the last minute and dropping a horse's claiming price and adding front wraps is the type of stuff which gives racing a bad name. That type of 'manipulation' causes integrity problems which draws people away from racing, not towards it.