Monday, September 21, 2009

Czars; Of Racing and Trotting

Mention the word "Czar" in racing and the eyes tend to glaze over. We know one is needed, we know that side deals and horseman contracts and everyone fighting for dwindling slices is too much to overcome. Or is it?

In British Columbia, a commissioner of racing might be a reality. And with this harsh (and in my opinion, bang-on) language, it appears this might not be the usual lip-service.

If you’re a horse-racing fan or work within this industry, look for several major changes to be implemented in 2010. And in a sport that does not adjust well to change, horse racing will have to face the reality: it’s time to do things differently.

When asked what else can be expected in the future, Coleman said a new direction is needed to get racing back on the right track. That includes for government to become more hands-on, including the creation of a manager to oversee the sport.

"I also believe we have to go to a professional management board to get rid of these old contracts and side deals that existed. This would make sure professional management of horse racing is not done by industry groups. They will still be funded, but funded for their own operation and objectives. And the new board will not be made up of the usual suspects," said Coleman.


More at link.

The Czar of Trotting, Muscle Hill, did not disappoint his legion of backers this weekend in the $1M Canadian Trotting Classic. It was a training mile. The last quarter was a little softer than we are used to with this colt, so perhaps he was not 100%, but when you win under a death grip by a large margin, that is probably splitting hairs. Here is the video evidence.

1 comment:

Pacingguy said...

Down in the states, there may be a glitch should the Czar approach be attempted here. The US Court of Appeals for the 8th circuit in Minneapolis just ruled that even though there is a collective agreement between the NFLPA and the NFL, two players suspended for substance abuse violations have the right to have their case heard in state court. If this case goes to the US Supreme Court and is upheld, it becomes the law of the land.